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Mother of the Groom Dress

Published:  May 27, 2010 by The Wedding Wizards

Traditional etiquette states the mother of the groom should wait until the mother of the bride has chosen a dress. The idea is for both mothers to end up wearing similarly formal dresses (one should not wear a ball gown if the other is wearing a strappy sundress).

Daymor

Not all brides (and mothers of the brides) follow all etiquette rules. You may feel more comfortable wearing a pantsuit instead of a traditional formal dress. This is not a problem, but it should be discussed with the bride and her mother to avoid any awkwardness.

The color of your dress should not match the mother of the bride, but you may want to stay in the same color family. You definitely will want to stay away from the same color as the bridesmaids. If you want to keep in line with the style of the bridesmaid dress, you can invite the bride to go shopping with you for your dress.

Black has been a color that mothers of the groom have stayed away from for years. It is gaining popularity, and if you are able to wear a colored jacket or scarf with your dress, it may be acceptable. The idea would be to stay away from a dress or outfit that will make you appear older or dowdy. You will also want to refrain from an outfit that can be also worn to a funeral (you will want something more festive than this).

Daymor

You will also want to avoid white, tan, ivory, or off-white (for the obvious reasons of course). Shopping for the mother of the groom dress is easier than in years past. With online shopping, you are able to go to “virtual boutiques” for prior to the wedding. This can give you an idea of what stores carry the items that are of interest to you. When it is time to shop for a dress (approximately 4-6 months prior to the wedding), allow yourself plenty of time to find a dress.

Besides shopping in bridal shops, elegant dresses and gowns can be found in department stores and boutiques. If you are not a shopper, selecting dresses online and having them shipped to your home might be an option for you. You can try on the dresses in the privacy of your own home. Be aware of your home lighting when doing this! The lighting in bridal studios and department stores tend to be brighter than the light we have in our homes.

Ultimately, if you are unable to find a dress that meets your satisfaction, consider finding a pattern that meets your requirements and have the gown made for you. Whatever gown you choose, looking your best on your son’s day is important. Find a style that fits and flatters, and you will not go wrong!

Visit TodaysBride.com for a complete list of local Bridal shops specializing in Mother-of dresses.

5 Hot Trends In Wedding Shoes For 2010

When making wedding preparations, brides usually give minimal attention to their wedding shoes. According to some people, shoes aren’t visible because they’re normally hidden inside the wedding dresses, whereas others say there is so much money spent on the wedding dresses that it becomes very difficult to spend on the shoes. This shouldn’t be the case. Your wedding shoes complement your wedding dress and therefore, should be given similar attention.

The trends for wedding shoes change along with trends for wedding dresses. Some of the wedding shoes that are trendy in 2010 are listed below:


1. Antique-looking wedding dresses are hot this year, resulting in styles of wedding shoes that show elements of the past such as Victorian-style beading.

2. Sexy and more feminine wedding shoes are trendy for 2010. “Strappy” styles will surely make the bride look sensual and daring as she walks down the aisle.

3. Embellished shoes, especially those using crystal or pave adornments, are also trendy for 2010.

4. Another top trend for 2010 is shoes with various shapes such as bows. If the shape is echoed in the dress, it can give a perfectly coordinated look.

5. Feathers in shoes are a new hot trend for 2010.

Wedding shoes are an important part of your wedding plans as they complement the dress. Trendy wedding shoes give a contemporary look to the bride and coordinate with current dress styles.   So, when purchasing your wedding shoes, consider what is trendy this year.

About the Author:
Paolo is the owner of onlinebridalstore.com that provides wedding accessories.  In the last ten years he delicately working on online bridal accessories like bridal shoes, wedding jewelry, wedding shoes, etc.

Under Creative Commons License: Attribution No Derivatives

What to Look for When Buying a Wedding Veil

By: Lisa Parker

Although many brides today walk down the aisle without a veil, it is still very much part of the bridal experience. Some brides choose not to wear a veil because they feel it does not fit their personality, style, or matches the dress. Other brides simply cannot imagine their wedding day without a veil. Those brides who feel they must have a veil are probably the same little girls that have taken a scarf, piece of fabric, or shawl and made their own “wedding veil” as they played wedding growing up.

Just because a bride wants a wedding veil does not mean she knows how to choose one. A wedding veil is the perfect way to complete the perfect bridal ensemble, from the dress to the jewelry to the shoes. The wedding veil is very much a part of the ensemble for many brides not only because it is a traditional part of the day but because of what it symbolizes. The wedding veil symbolizes suspense and a new beginning for the bride, her groom, and all the guests.

Choosing your own veil can be quite a difficult task. There is a wide variety of wedding veils to choose from and the prices vary as well. First and foremost, when choosing a wedding veil, make sure that you have chosen your wedding gown. This is the best way to determine not only which style veil works best for you, but also what your budget will allow. Use these tips and suggestions when shopping for a wedding veil to make sure that you get exactly what you want.

The Wedding Venue

While you may not have considered it, the venue of your wedding will also have an impact on the type of wedding veil that will work best for you. An indoor, formal church wedding is the ideal place for a formal, elaborate veil with all the trimmings. If you are tying the knot outside on the beach, or at the courthouse, you may want a simple, short wedding veil.

The Wedding Gown

Think about the style of your wedding gown before you settle on a wedding veil. The dress and the veil should actually complement each other. If you are wearing an informal wedding dress, you probably will not want a formal wedding veil and headpiece. Also, if your wedding dress is long, the longer your veil should be and vice versa. Remember to use common sense when buying a wedding veil and you should do fine.

The Hair Style

Think about how you will wear your hair on the wedding day. Are you keeping your locks long and lovely or sweeping them up in a funky, fantastic up-do? If you have short hair, you may not want to buy an elaborate wedding veil. Your best bet is to keep it simple and stylish. You may want to bring your veil to your hair salon for a few “practice” sessions before the big day.

The Hair Accessories

If you have already established what hair accessories, if any, you will be using on your wedding day, bring them along when you shop for the wedding veil. Remember, less is more, so if you have chosen beautifully detailed hair pins, you will want your wedding veil to be simple and understated.

The Veil Price

A key factor in staying sane during all the wedding planning and hoopla is to stay within your budget. When figuring your budget, determine how much you will spend on your wedding dress and the veil and stick to it. A few ways to save a few bucks when buying a wedding veil is to shop sample sales or ask to purchase the floor model. You could even make your own wedding veil if you are handy with a needle and thread!

One more thing…

Remember, your wedding veil doesn’t have to come “as is.” You can have your wedding veil tailored by your favorite seamstress based on your specifications. This means that the veil will fit you perfectly, will not fall off, and will never overpower your dress. Tailoring your wedding veil will also ensure that the veil you wear down the aisle is like no other.

The perfect wedding veil is out there waiting for you; you just need to know how to find it. Using these simple tips will make the quest for the perfect veil that much easier. Your wedding is a special occasion and an event to remember, so walk down that aisle in style!

About the Author

Lisa Parker is a freelance writer who writes about weddings, often focusing on a specific aspect of weddings such as a wedding veil.

(ArticlesBase SC #875319)

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/ – What to Look for When Buying a Wedding Veil

In Remembrance of Family That Has Passed

How to Keep the Mood Joyous While Remembering a Relative that has passed at Your Wedding

When a parent or other close relative has passed away recently, it’s important to find an appropriate way to remember them without ruining the joyous tone of the wedding. After all, a wedding is a celebration, and while a missing parent is certainly sad, it shouldn’t overpower the wedding day.

Some ways to remember a parent:

  • Set up a special small table at the wedding reception with a flower arrangement and a card saying “In memory of those loved ones who are not with us today” or more specifically, “In memory of Martina Jensen, mother of the bride.” You could also put a picture of the bride or groom with the deceased person you are honoring.


  • At the wedding reception, display wedding pictures of family members, or pictures of loved ones with the bride/groom. This is a more subtle way of not only honoring the bride & groom’s parents but also including the dead in your day.

  • Wear a piece of jewelry or article of clothing. (For example your mother’s wedding dress, your father’s cuff links, or your grandfather’s signet ring).

  • Carry the same flowers that your mother had in her bouquet.

  • Attach a small photo frame of the loved to your bouquet.

  • At the end of the wedding program, it is appropriate to add a memoriam line. For example, you might write “Today we honor those who could not be with us, especially the bride’s stepmother Alison Janet Brooks.”

  • If the person who is conducting the ceremony is someone who knew the deceased relative, it might be appropriate for him/her to say something during the ceremony – particularly if they are saying a homily or other sermon-like speech. They might say “Today, we have come together to celebrate the love of these two people and the life they are building together. As many of you know, the groom’s father recently passed away. And in times like these, it can be more important than ever to honor love and family. I know (groom’s father) was so happy to see (groom) find the love he has with (bride). Although it would be easy for his recent death to make this a sad occasion, (Groom’s father) would want to see you all so happy today,celebrating and full of joy. So today, let’s remember how precious life is, and be thankful that (bride and groom) are creating a new family together.”

By Nina Callaway, About.com
Center photos by Catherine McKinley Photography, courtesy of Elizabeth & Rob Mosher


Get the Facts – Wedding Dress Preservation

By: Katherine Wright

Why Preserve Your Bridal Gown?

You spent a great deal of time and thought selecting your wedding dress. You may hope that a younger sister or perhaps even a daughter will someday wear your gown. Or you may want to hold onto your beautiful gown for sentimental reasons. Either way, your wedding gown is a treasured keepsake that if properly cleaned and preserved, can last for years to come.

After the wedding, many bridal gowns are left in the plastic garment bag with good intentions of cleaning and preservation sometime soon. That soon often turns into weeks, and then years. This procrastination poses some serious risks to the gown:

  • Oxidation of stains, seen and unseen. Your dress may have noticeable stains from food or make-up, or the hemline may be soiled. Or your dress may look clean to you, but don’t be fooled, spills from alcoholic beverages or clear soda may dry clear, but oxidize with time, turn brown and become more difficult to remove later. Body perspiration may cause the dress lining to turn brittle over time. Your dress needs to be cleaned in order to keep it in the best condition possible.
  • Plastic fumes: Gowns kept in plastic gown bags are exposed to the most harmful environment possible: plastic fumes. Most plastic gives off chemical fumes that cause the yellowing of bridal gowns. Some brides take the initiative to get their dress cleaned, but still leave their gown in the dry-cleaner’s plastic wrap or garment bag.

Cleaning and preserving your bridal gown as soon as possible ensures that your gown remains in the best condition possible. Ideally, your dress should be cleaned and preserved within days or weeks of your wedding.

Determining the Best Gown Preservation

A good way to determine the best bridal gown preservation technique would be to check with museum textile conservators to see how they preserve heirloom garments.

Museum Garment Preservation

The Victoria and Albert Museum in London has a wonderful collection of gowns that are hundreds of years old. The dresses in storage are hung on padded hangers and covered with cotton sheeting to protect them.

Garment preservation at the Smithsonian Institute in Washington D.C. is similar. Heirloom garments that are not currently on display are cleaned and carefully stored in climate controlled conditions. Many dresses are hung on padded hangers, while some garments are laid in drawers or acid free boxes with acid free tissue. Sharp creases are avoided, as they can damage fabric. To keep the folds from becoming permanent creases, the garments stored in boxes or drawers are refolded into a different position every few years.

Neither of these museums seals any of their heirloom garments. Museum conservators discourage sealing any garment in any container for three reasons:

  1. Fabric weakens where it is folded. Fabric weakens in the same way that paper weakens where it is folded, so that creases from the folds may become permanent. (You may have experienced this if you have ever let down the hem on a garment.) Or worse, the fabric may tear at the weakened creases. This is why the Smithsonian refolds the garments stored in drawers and boxes periodically.
  2. Inspection is critical. Periodic inspection ensures that the garment does not develop permanent damage from oxidizing stains or any other problems. The sooner problems are discovered, the more likely they can be remedied.
  3. Sealing promotes mold and mildew. If the textile can breathe, then the humidity remains constant around the garment. If any moisture were to condense inside a storage container, it would likely develop mildew.

Museum conservators recommend keeping heirloom garments: clean, cool, dry and wrinkle-free.

Bridal Gown Preservation

The first step to wedding gown preservation is to have it cleaned thoroughly.  Keeping your gown in the best possible condition is your next goal. You will need to protect it from:

  • Yellowing
  • Permanent creasing
  • Mildew and mold
  • Oxidation spots
  • Light
  • Dust

Yellowing
It’s important to note that one of the leading causes of bridal gown yellowing is the plastic bags that many brides keep their gowns in. Most plastics give off damaging fumes that actually promote yellowing. But, even with proper care, some fabrics will yellow more than others and it may be impossible to prevent all yellowing.

Generally, silk fabric yellows more than synthetic fabrics, such as polyester, rayon and acetate. However, nylon, which is a synthetic, has a tendency to yellow more than other synthetic fabrics. Gowns that can be wet cleaned have an advantage, in that if they do yellow, they may be able to be whitened for future use with a fabric whitener.

Preserving your gown in an acid-free environment is your best protection against yellowing. Padding your gown with acid-free tissue will help to prevent acid migration. Buffered tissue should be used for gowns made of synthetic fabrics such as polyester, rayon, and acetate. The buffering agents in the buffered tissue gives added protection against acid migration. But buffering agents may damage gowns made of animal proteins such as silk or wool, therefore un-buffered, acid-free tissue is recommended for silk fabrics.

What about warranties against yellowing?
Some preservation companies advertise that their preservation method will prevent yellowing and they may even offer a warranty. Look carefully at any warranty offered by these companies. One warranty offered by a leading on-line preservation company stated that they will cover discoloration and damages caused by their company’s cleaning and preservation processes. Another simply states that the gown may be returned to a participating dealer for inspection and pressing. None of them state that they will replace an aged, yellowed gown with a new gown.

Keeping your gown in the best overall condition should be the primary concern in preserving your bridal gown. So, protect your gown! Get it out of the plastic bag and have it cleaned and preserved in an acid-free environment.

Permanent creasing
Flat storage is recommended for textiles and garments when possible. However, because of the size and dimensions of wedding gowns, it is impractical. Some compromise must be made, either by folding or hanging the gown. To help prevent permanent creasing, boxed gowns should be refolded into a different position every 2 – 3 years. (Cotton gloves should always be worn when handling preserved gowns.) Bagged gowns that are hung in a closet are not at risk for permanent creasing, and will not need to be handled periodically.

Mildew and mold
Keeping your gown in a breathable environment will protect it best from mildew and mold growth. When fabrics can breathe, the humidity level remains constant around the garment as excess moisture dissipates into the air. But, if moisture can condense inside a box or any container, then the gown is at risk for mildew and mold growth.

Oxidation spots
An oxidation spot can occur when a substance that was not properly cleaned on the dress oxidizes and turns brown. This can happen even if your dress has been cleaned as dry-cleaning solvents do not remove all substances. Spills from clear soda or wine may go unnoticed at the time of the initial cleaning. Unless these spills are pretreated, it is likely they will oxidize over time. Inspecting preserved gowns periodically ensures the gown remains in the best condition. The sooner an oxidized stain is caught, the more likely it will be able to be removed.

Light and dust
Keeping your gown covered will protect it from the damage caused by light and dust.

Preservation Options

There are several different types of gown preservation offered today. While there are slight variations offered, each will usually fall into one of these three categories:

  • Sealing
  • Boxing
  • Bagging

Sealing, Boxing or Bagging your Bridal Gown

Sealing
Most bridal gown preservation companies preserve bridal gowns in an acid-free box. Many have a window in which to see the gown. Acid-free tissue is usually used to buffer the folds and a cardboard shape is often used to fill the bodice area of the gown. However, some companies actually seal the gown inside the box.

The assumption with sealing the bridal gown is that the dress needs to be protected from oxygen. However, sealing a bridal gown puts it at greater risk for mildew and permanent creasing damage. Inspection is also impossible if the gown is sealed.

Boxing
Boxed preservation is similar to the sealing method but has some important differences. Like the sealing method, your dress is first cleaned and pressed, and then folded into an acid-free box. Sharp creases are avoided, and acid free tissue is used to buffer the folds. However, unlike the sealing method, the box is not sealed, and you are encouraged to open and inspect your gown.

Because the box is not sealed, the fabric can still breathe. And you will be able to refold your gown periodically. This will help protect your gown from getting permanent creases.

The appeal for a boxed or sealed gown is often greatest for brides with large dresses hoping to get their gowns out of their closet. However, this method may work best for smaller gowns that require minimal folding.

Acid-free box or just acid-free coated?
The quality of the acid-free boxes can vary significantly. Many preservation boxes are simply regular cardboard boxes with an acid free coating. These coatings will not hold up as well as authentic archival boxes made from actual acid-free board.

Bagging your bridal gown
This newer preservation method is not really so new. It is similar to what museums have used for preserving heirloom costumes and gowns for years. Often referred to as Museum Method,TM this preservation method is an excellent option, as it keeps the dress protected from dust and light. The gown remains un-folded, so permanent creasing risks are reduced. The bag allows the gown to breathe, which is essential in protecting the gown from mold and mildew. A bagged gown is the easiest to inspect periodically and requires no re-folding as the boxed method does.

Strapless and spaghetti strapped gowns, as well as heavy gowns should be reinforced with twill tape to add support, and eliminate any damage from long-term hanging. A padded hanger is also essential for long-term storage.

It is important to remember that a clean dress should not be left in the dry-cleaner’s plastic wrap or put back into a plastic garment bag. Remember, most plastics are an enemy to textiles. And the bagged gown should always be kept in climate controlled conditions. This is easily done is most closets.

Gown Preservation Options Overview

Sealing Benefits

Boxing Benefits

Bagging Benefits

  • Acid-free environment

  • Acid-free environment

  • Acid-free environment

  • Easily stored

  • Easily stored

  • Easily stored

  • Protected from dust and light

  • Protected from dust and light

  • Protected from dust and light

  • Can be inspected and admired

  • Most easily inspected and admired

  • Dress can breathe

  • Dress can breathe

  • Can be refolded periodically

  • Does not need refolding

  • No permanent creasing

  • Best air circulation

  • Needs no maintenance

No matter what type of preservation you choose, you should keep your preserved gown in a climate-controlled area. Do not be tempted to put your preserved gown in an attic or damp basement where temperatures and humidity levels will fluctuate dramatically. Fluctuating temperatures increase the deterioration rate of textiles.
 Leaving your wedding gown in a vinyl bridal gown bag will promote rapid yellowing. This article discusses this and other risks of not preserving wedding gowns. Also discussed are museum recommended garment preservation techniques, and the benefits of the varying wedding gown preservation options of sealing, boxing or Museum Method (hanging) preservation.
 

About the Author

Katherine Wright is a wedding gown preservation specialist and general partner of Heritage Garment Preservation located in Benicia, California providing Museum Method wedding gown preservation to the United States, Canada, and Europe.

(ArticlesBase SC #636831)

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/Get the Facts – Wedding Dress Preservation

St. Patrick’s Day Themed Wedding

March 17th is quickly approaching and with it the classic green beer of St. Patrick’s Day. Green has traditionally been associated with spring and new growth so it is a very appropriate color for your wedding and celebrating your new growth as a couple. Here are some ideas for a St. Patrick’s Day themed wedding.

David's Bridal

When you are picking colors for your wedding, green may not be on the top of your list. But, when you are planning a St. Patrick’s Day wedding, green is the best color to use for this theme. The plus side is that there are so many different shades of green to pick from a shamrock green to a dark, hunter green, so finding a shade that looks great on everyone in your bridal party shouldn’t be a problem. You may even want to mix it up and use a bunch of different shades of green that compliment each other.   For a more formal wedding, green bridesmaid dresses would be lovely, especially if you incorporated traditional Irish elements like gold ribbons in their hair or bouquets. Shamrocks would make festive boutonnières for the groom and his men. Or if you prefer a more casual affair, perhaps you could dress as Irish fairies and leprechauns with airy gowns, green jackets, and buckled top hats.

When you are choosing a design for your wedding invitations, you may want to go with a Celtic knot or cross as the focal point of the design. You could also incorporate the Celtic knot or cross into the rest of your ceremony maybe in a wax seal for your programs, or as the decoration for your wedding cake. You may be able to find some napkin holders that have a symbol of the knot or cross on them. However, you choose to use it, it is definitely one of those extra little details that will pull everything together.

When selecting the music for your ceremony, some traditional Irish music would be a perfect touch to your special day. Not only is Irish music romantic and beautiful, but also its instrumental ballads will add just the right touch to take your St. Patrick’s Day wedding from clash to class.

Irish wedding blessings are similar to Irish readings. Some can be shortened versions of Irish readings. Blessings can be said at any time throughout the traditional Irish wedding day. Sometimes the mother of the bride or groom will say a short blessing before the ceremony in the privacy of family and friends.

A friend or family member may include a blessing in a toast or speech after the wedding. Frequently, the couple chooses an Irish wedding blessing to include on their wedding program or a small card that guests receive upon entering the church.

When choosing the foods for your reception, don’t feel like you have to go all out with the green food coloring. Why not take a different approach and serve traditional Irish dishes such as Irish stew, bacon and cabbage, coddle, bread pudding, and soda bread. Of course, no Irish wedding celebration would be complete without the Guiness!

When you are decorating you could use greenery, white Christmas lights, and candles. This is sure to set the right mood for your ceremony and reception. Don’t be afraid to use colors like white and yellow to help contrast the green, and to incorporate those colors into your floral arrangements. Maybe you and your groom could stand in front of a huge Celtic cross wrapped in greenery and Christmas lights while you say your vows? Whatever you choose, don’t be afraid to get creative and do some research to pull lots of ideas from traditional Irish weddings.

Wedding favor ideas for a St. Patrick’s day wedding easily come to mind. Gold foil coins in small caldrons or tulle bags are a simple yet fitting favor. Or in keeping with the idea of the “luck of the Irish” you could “give guests a lucky, rabbit foot’s key chain.” Small clay pots spray painted gold with shamrock or clover seeds are another clever idea. Or if you prefer you could give your guests a rainbow – a bag of colorful jelly beans, mints, or M&Ms.  Another great idea for wedding favors would be to purchase some potted four-leaf clovers and put your names and wedding date on the side to give to your guests as they leave. This is something they can take home and plant and it symbolizes your growing love for each other.

Consider Celtic-style wedding bands.  They are used by some people claiming Irish or Scottish descent. This style of wedding band will often be engraved or embossed with a Celtic knot design, which is meant to symbolize oneness and continuity. Sometimes a Claddagh design is also used to symbolize fidelity.

There is also the Celtic Knot.  The ancient Celts based their artwork on geometric shapes, and it is estimated that there are eight basic pattern types. Although the exact meaning of Celtic Knotwork is not known, the patterns are commonly considered as representations of the way that life interconnects in an endless cycle.

May the light of friendship guide your paths together. May the laughter of children grace the halls of your home. May the joy of living for one another trip a smile from your lips, A twinkle from your eye. May the Spirit of Love find a dwelling place in your hearts  ~an Irish Blessing

Latest Trend in Wedding Veils: the Birdcage Veil

by Benjamin Dover,  Staff Writer Factoidz.com

Although the “birdcage” name refers to the shaping of the veil to “float” over the face, head (or part of the face and head) and to extend no longer than the chin, it’s a common misconception that “birdcage” means anything made with large-gauge millinery netting.  But “birdcage” is the style (slightly bouffant and “enclosing” the face like a cage), not the fabric.  A birdcage-style short bridal veil can be made from the usual fine tulle of traditional veils–but the stiffness of the larger-gauge netting is more conducive to “floating” over the face without rubbing against the ends of the eyelashes.

Generally made of French, Russian or English netting–all essentially the same except for the ever-so-slightly increasing size (3/8-, 1/4-, or 1/2-inch, respectively) of the squares in the net, these veils may be unadorned and anchored by a clear comb, or have that stark simplicity offset by a dramatic ornament.  Even with the modern minimalist twist of cropping the length of the netting to just below eye-level or sweeping asymmetrically across the face, the statement of that big-gauge milliners’ netting lends the look a retro-chic tone from the 30’s and 40’s that couldn’t be more up-to-the-minute right now.



Actually, if our social customs were more attuned to the cocktail-hat set across “the Pond,” we would already be familiar with this type of headpiece as a “Fascinator,” as the English call them –a cocktail topper that’s more of an oversized hair ornament (often including a bit of this netting) than an actual hat.

Because of the bold geometry of the netting, the birdcage veil is at its best with simply-cut gowns in richly-draping fabrics, without lace, beading, or embroidery to vie for visual attention.  Perhaps, since brooches made their comeback a year or two ago and there are some fabulous ones available, you might purchase a matching pair of rhinestone brooches, one as a focal point on the gown, and the other by itself or as the center of the embellishment to the headpiece (often feathers or a circle of the gathered netting–but the overall look can also be softened by some retro-looking florals, keeping the monotone of ivory or white).

Less is definitely more with a birdcage veil; although it’s relatively small in comparison with other veils, it makes a strong, fashion-forward statement.  It needs to be carried off with confidence, so it’s not for a timid, traditional bride.

If that confidence and a love of being a little different sounds like you, consider the look of a birdcage veil.


To find a bridal shop near you visit our website at http://www.todaysbrideonline.com/topics/bridalattire.phtml