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In Remembrance of Family That Has Passed

How to Keep the Mood Joyous While Remembering a Relative that has passed at Your Wedding

When a parent or other close relative has passed away recently, it’s important to find an appropriate way to remember them without ruining the joyous tone of the wedding. After all, a wedding is a celebration, and while a missing parent is certainly sad, it shouldn’t overpower the wedding day.

Some ways to remember a parent:

  • Set up a special small table at the wedding reception with a flower arrangement and a card saying “In memory of those loved ones who are not with us today” or more specifically, “In memory of Martina Jensen, mother of the bride.” You could also put a picture of the bride or groom with the deceased person you are honoring.


  • At the wedding reception, display wedding pictures of family members, or pictures of loved ones with the bride/groom. This is a more subtle way of not only honoring the bride & groom’s parents but also including the dead in your day.

  • Wear a piece of jewelry or article of clothing. (For example your mother’s wedding dress, your father’s cuff links, or your grandfather’s signet ring).

  • Carry the same flowers that your mother had in her bouquet.

  • Attach a small photo frame of the loved to your bouquet.

  • At the end of the wedding program, it is appropriate to add a memoriam line. For example, you might write “Today we honor those who could not be with us, especially the bride’s stepmother Alison Janet Brooks.”

  • If the person who is conducting the ceremony is someone who knew the deceased relative, it might be appropriate for him/her to say something during the ceremony – particularly if they are saying a homily or other sermon-like speech. They might say “Today, we have come together to celebrate the love of these two people and the life they are building together. As many of you know, the groom’s father recently passed away. And in times like these, it can be more important than ever to honor love and family. I know (groom’s father) was so happy to see (groom) find the love he has with (bride). Although it would be easy for his recent death to make this a sad occasion, (Groom’s father) would want to see you all so happy today,celebrating and full of joy. So today, let’s remember how precious life is, and be thankful that (bride and groom) are creating a new family together.”

By Nina Callaway, About.com
Center photos by Catherine McKinley Photography, courtesy of Elizabeth & Rob Mosher


Irish Wedding Traditions

By: Rafi Michael

There is one wedding Irish tradition that states: ‘Marry in May and Rue the Day’ while another states: ‘Marry in April if you can, joy for maiden and for man’.

When I told my daughter about this Irish superstition, she changed her wedding date so that she’d be married in April!

What began as a search for Irish traditions and customs that she could incorporate into her celebration ended up as an incredible pile of notes that eventually took on a life of its own. Long after her wedding, I was still obsessed with delving into history and folklore, looking for everything I could find on how weddings were celebrated in Ireland long ago.

I am convinced that if couples make the effort, they can have a totally Irish celebration from beginning to end – even to the pre-wedding parties. There’s one quaint custom where the groom was invited to the bride’s house right before the wedding and they cooked a goose in his honor.

It was called Aitin’ the gander – it has to be where we get the expression ‘his goose is cooked!’ We threw one of these dinner parties for my daughter and everyone had a great time. (The apple-potato stuffing has become a family favorite!).

There are so many other traditions, customs and just an incredible amount of folklore to draw upon, that it would be remiss to be of Irish descent and not take advantage of all the possibilities.

Here are just a few ideas culled from what eventually has become a 200-plus page book called ‘The Traditional Irish Wedding’ and it is now available in the United States and will be released in Ireland this spring. As complete as I could make it, the book covers attire, decor, menus, recipes, music, toasts, vows, and perhaps of most value, a resource listing that will help you find everything from Irish wedding gowns and tiaras to sheet music for a Celtic Mass.

Here are some more:

* Bunratty Meade is a honey wine that’s served at the Bunratty Castle medieval banquet. It’s from a recipe based on the oldest drink in Ireland and if you’ve never tasted it, it’s well worth trying. In the old days, it was consumed at weddings because it was thought that it promoted virility. (If a baby was born nine months after the wedding, it was attributed to the mead!) Couples also drank it from special goblets for a full month following the wedding, which is supposedly where we get the word honeymoon. This was to protect the couple from the fairies coming to spirit the bride away.

* Lucky horseshoe. Irish brides used to carry a real horseshoe for good luck. (Turned up so the luck won’t run out). You can get porcelain horseshoes which most Irish brides carry these days, or one made of fabric which is worn on the wrist.

* Magic Hanky. This charming custom involves having the bride carry a special hanky that with a few stitches can be turned into a christening bonnet for the first baby. With a couple of snips it can be turned back into a hanky that your child can carry on his/her wedding day.

* Make-up bells. The chime of bells is thought to keep evil spirits away, restore harmony if a couple is fighting, and also remind a couple of their wedding vows. Giving a bell as a gift has become an Irish tradition. You could also have your greeters hand out tiny bells to your guests to ring as you process. (You might want to let them know when they’re supposed to be rung – perhaps mention it in your program along with an explanation of the custom). Guests could also ring their little bells at the reception in lieu of clinking glasses.

* Irish Dancers. Consider hiring a group of Irish dancers to hand out your programs before the ceremony. Dressed in their full regalia, it would add a wonderful touch of pageantry and color. They could also dance at the reception later. We did this at my daughter’s reception and it was a major hit.

* Music. There’s so much wonderful Irish music available, you’ll have no problems in finding appropriate selections for both the ceremony and the reception. The difficulty will be in deciding which pieces to play!

* Readings: My daughter had the following Irish wedding vow on the front of her program:

By the power that Christ brought from heaven, mayst thou love me. As the sun follows its course, mayst thou follow me. As light to the eye, as bread to the hungry, as joy to the heart, may thy presence be with me, oh one that I love, ’til death comes to part us asunder.

On the back of the program, she had this old Irish proverb: Don’t walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don’t walk behind me, I may not lead. Walk beside me and just be my friend.

* The Irish Wedding Song. Very popular at contemporary Irish weddings. We had two friends sing this at my daughter’s reception while the newlyweds cut the cake. (Afterwards I thought we should have had the lyrics typed up and placed on the tables so that everyone could join in).

* Flowers. In the old days, many Irish brides wore a wreath of wildflowers in their hair; they also carried them in bouquets. For my daughter’s wedding, our florist designed gorgeous bouquets that included a flower called Bells of Ireland. In Wales, brides carried live myrtle and gave a sprig to each bridesmaid which they planted. If it grew, the bridesmaid would marry within the year. If you’re planning a more general Celtic celebration, this might be worth considering.

* Ancient custom: In the old days, couples ate salt and oatmeal at the beginning of their reception: Each of them took three mouthfuls as a protection against the power of the evil eye. Also, when a couple is dancing, the bride can’t take both feet off the floor because the fairies will get the upper hand. Fairies love beautiful things and one of their favorites is a bride. There’s many an Irish legend about brides being spirited away by the little people! For the same reason, it’s bad luck for a bride to wear green. I’ve also heard that it’s bad luck for anyone to wear green at an Irish wedding – but I think it really only applies to the bride. It’s also bad luck for a bride or the groom to sing at their own wedding.

Portents and omens:

* A fine day meant good luck, especially if the sun shone on the bride. If you’re a Roman Catholic, one way to make certain that it won’t rain is to put a statue of the Infant of Prague outside the church before your ceremony.

* It was unlucky to marry on a Saturday.

* Those who married in harvest would spend all their lives gathering

* A man should always be the first to wish joy to the bride, never a woman

*It was lucky to hear a cuckoo on the wedding morning, or to see three magpies

* To meet a funeral on the road meant bad luck and if there was a funeral procession planned for that day, the wedding party always took a different road

* The wedding party should always take the longest road home from the church

* It was bad luck if a glass or cup were broken on the wedding day

*A bride and groom should never wash their hands in the same sink at the same time-it’s courting disaster if they do

* It was said to be lucky if you married during a ‘growing moon and a flowing tide’

* When leaving the church, someone must throw an old shoe over the bride’s head so she will have good luck

* If the bride’s mother-in-law breaks a piece of wedding cake on the bride’s head as she enters the house after the ceremony, they will be friends for life.

Many other customs are interspersed throughout the book, e.g. (from the reception section) the top tier of your wedding cake should be an Irish whiskey cake which is saved for the christening of your first baby. I’ve also heard of another custom which just came to my attention and will be included in the next edition: a bottle of champagne is saved from the reception so that it can be used to ‘wet the baby’s head’ at the christening.

In finally making this book a reality, my hope is that when he says to you ‘would you like to be buried with my people’, or you say to him ‘would you like to hang your washing next to mine’, you’ll say yes, and then use the suggestions to help you plan an Irish celebration reflective of your roots and as romantic as your heritage.

And for all engaged couples and their families in the midst of pre-wedding chaos, I raise a parting glass: May all your joys be pure joy and all your pain champagne.

More information on Traditional Irish Weddings can be found here

About the Author

Toronto Weddings Photographers Wedding Photography & Video Productions Toronto we specialize in individually tailored Wedding Photography, Videos and DVD’s, offering an experienced, highly professional and affordable service.

(ArticlesBase SC #189454)

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/Irish Wedding Traditions

St. Patrick’s Day Themed Wedding

March 17th is quickly approaching and with it the classic green beer of St. Patrick’s Day. Green has traditionally been associated with spring and new growth so it is a very appropriate color for your wedding and celebrating your new growth as a couple. Here are some ideas for a St. Patrick’s Day themed wedding.

David's Bridal

When you are picking colors for your wedding, green may not be on the top of your list. But, when you are planning a St. Patrick’s Day wedding, green is the best color to use for this theme. The plus side is that there are so many different shades of green to pick from a shamrock green to a dark, hunter green, so finding a shade that looks great on everyone in your bridal party shouldn’t be a problem. You may even want to mix it up and use a bunch of different shades of green that compliment each other.   For a more formal wedding, green bridesmaid dresses would be lovely, especially if you incorporated traditional Irish elements like gold ribbons in their hair or bouquets. Shamrocks would make festive boutonnières for the groom and his men. Or if you prefer a more casual affair, perhaps you could dress as Irish fairies and leprechauns with airy gowns, green jackets, and buckled top hats.

When you are choosing a design for your wedding invitations, you may want to go with a Celtic knot or cross as the focal point of the design. You could also incorporate the Celtic knot or cross into the rest of your ceremony maybe in a wax seal for your programs, or as the decoration for your wedding cake. You may be able to find some napkin holders that have a symbol of the knot or cross on them. However, you choose to use it, it is definitely one of those extra little details that will pull everything together.

When selecting the music for your ceremony, some traditional Irish music would be a perfect touch to your special day. Not only is Irish music romantic and beautiful, but also its instrumental ballads will add just the right touch to take your St. Patrick’s Day wedding from clash to class.

Irish wedding blessings are similar to Irish readings. Some can be shortened versions of Irish readings. Blessings can be said at any time throughout the traditional Irish wedding day. Sometimes the mother of the bride or groom will say a short blessing before the ceremony in the privacy of family and friends.

A friend or family member may include a blessing in a toast or speech after the wedding. Frequently, the couple chooses an Irish wedding blessing to include on their wedding program or a small card that guests receive upon entering the church.

When choosing the foods for your reception, don’t feel like you have to go all out with the green food coloring. Why not take a different approach and serve traditional Irish dishes such as Irish stew, bacon and cabbage, coddle, bread pudding, and soda bread. Of course, no Irish wedding celebration would be complete without the Guiness!

When you are decorating you could use greenery, white Christmas lights, and candles. This is sure to set the right mood for your ceremony and reception. Don’t be afraid to use colors like white and yellow to help contrast the green, and to incorporate those colors into your floral arrangements. Maybe you and your groom could stand in front of a huge Celtic cross wrapped in greenery and Christmas lights while you say your vows? Whatever you choose, don’t be afraid to get creative and do some research to pull lots of ideas from traditional Irish weddings.

Wedding favor ideas for a St. Patrick’s day wedding easily come to mind. Gold foil coins in small caldrons or tulle bags are a simple yet fitting favor. Or in keeping with the idea of the “luck of the Irish” you could “give guests a lucky, rabbit foot’s key chain.” Small clay pots spray painted gold with shamrock or clover seeds are another clever idea. Or if you prefer you could give your guests a rainbow – a bag of colorful jelly beans, mints, or M&Ms.  Another great idea for wedding favors would be to purchase some potted four-leaf clovers and put your names and wedding date on the side to give to your guests as they leave. This is something they can take home and plant and it symbolizes your growing love for each other.

Consider Celtic-style wedding bands.  They are used by some people claiming Irish or Scottish descent. This style of wedding band will often be engraved or embossed with a Celtic knot design, which is meant to symbolize oneness and continuity. Sometimes a Claddagh design is also used to symbolize fidelity.

There is also the Celtic Knot.  The ancient Celts based their artwork on geometric shapes, and it is estimated that there are eight basic pattern types. Although the exact meaning of Celtic Knotwork is not known, the patterns are commonly considered as representations of the way that life interconnects in an endless cycle.

May the light of friendship guide your paths together. May the laughter of children grace the halls of your home. May the joy of living for one another trip a smile from your lips, A twinkle from your eye. May the Spirit of Love find a dwelling place in your hearts  ~an Irish Blessing

Today’s Bride Announces 2010-2011 Bridal Show Schedule

CLEVELAND OCTOBER 2010 SHOW
Sun, Oct 17, 2010
Embassy Suites, Independence
5800 Rockside Woods Blvd., Independence, OH
Doors Open:  10am – 4pm
Fashion Shows: 11:30am, 1:00pm, & 2:30pm

AKRON/CANTON OCTOBER 2010 SHOW
Sun, Oct. 24, 2010
Sheraton Suites
1989 Front Street, Cuyahoga Falls, OH
Doors open: 10 – 4pm.
Fashion Shows: 11:30am, 1:00pm, & 2:30pm

Each event has OVER 80 Exhibitors, Henri’s Discount Gown Showroom, Battle of the Grooms, Make-Over Bride, Prizes, Discounts, and Giveaways!  Each attending bride will receive a current copy Today’s Bride Magazine (while supplies last)
$10 Admission.  Purchase Tickets online at http://www.todaysbride.com at 50% off!

AKRON/CANTON JANUARY 2011 SHOW
Sun, January 9, 2011
John S. Knight Center, Akron, OH
77 E. Mill St., Akron, OH
Doors open: 10 – 5pm.

Fashion Shows: 11:00am, 12:30pm, 2:00pm & 3:30pm, American Commodore Tuxedo Dancers, latest fashions in Bridal gowns, Veils, Mother-of dresses, Bridesmaids dresses and more!

Over 150 Wedding Professionals to help you plan your BIG day!  Henri’s Discount Gown Showroom, Gallery of Reception Table Ideas, Gallery of Wedding Cakes, Portrait Gallery, Prizes, Discounts, and so much more!  Each attending bride will receive a current copy Today’s Bride Magazine (while supplies last).
$10 admission.  Purchase tickets at 50% off by registering at www.todaysbride.com

CLEVELAND JANUARY 2010 SHOW – Now 2 Days!
Sat. & Sun, January 15 & 16, 2011
I-X Center, Cleveland, OH
One I-X Center Dr., Cleveland, OH
Doors open: 1/16/11 from 4-8pm
1/15/11 from 10 – 5pm.

Fashion Shows on Sunday:  11:00am, 12:30pm, 2:00pm & 3:30pm, American Commodore Tuxedo Dancers, latest fashions in Bridal gowns, Veils, Mother-of dresses, Bridesmaids dresses and more!

Over 200 Wedding Professionals to help you plan your BIG day!  Henri’s Discount Gown Showroom, Gallery of Reception Table Ideas, Gallery of Wedding Cakes, Portrait Gallery, Prizes, Discounts, and so much more!  Each attending bride will receive a current copy Today’s Bride Magazine (while supplies last)
$8 parking, $10 Admission. Purchase Tickets at 50% off online at www.todaysbride.com.

Classic Style Trumps Trendy Ideas for a Wedding

Wedding album, videos and a carefully preserved gown — your wedding mementos are meant to be precious reminders of your special day. But you may find yourself cringing with shame when you look at your album years down the road if you choose trendy over traditional style for the look of your wedding.

It’s easy to tell the difference between a look that’s trendy and a more classic style. Think of the bell bottoms and love beads from the ‘70s and big hair and “Dynasty”-style gowns of the ‘80s — looks that were “hot” at one time, but that years later elicit an eye-roll and a “what was I thinking” attitude from women who wore them.

Audrey Hepburn in Funny Face, 1957

Now consider the elegance, grace and demure femininity of icons like Grace Kelly, Ingrid Bergman and Audrey Hepburn. Their style was classic and timeless — and one that today’s smart bride mimics to ensure she’ll love the look of her wedding as much in 20 years as she does the day she walks down the aisle.

Today’s bride knows that choosing fabrics, silhouettes and accessories borrowed from the classic era — the 1940s through the 1960s — will give her wedding and gown timeless appeal. No dated looks from easy-to-identify fashion fads for her. The classic look also plays well with the growing trend to achieve less with more by accenting the basics with luxurious finishing touches.
Here’s how to achieve that classic look for your spring wedding:
The Dress
Avoid large, modern swags of fabrics in favor of silhouettes that emphasize an hourglass figure. Nipped-in waists, or waistlines defined with belts and sashes, often in a color that slightly contrasts with the dress, create an elegant, eternal style. You can draw your classic style from the ‘40s, ‘50s and even ‘60s.
Designers offer charming gowns that evoke the look of 1950s prom dresses with fitted bodices and full skirts in tulle, lace and appliqué. For a 1960s look, a shorter, sophisticated frock with a gathered waist and narrow skirt will be reminiscent of the classic ‘60s cocktail dress.
The Accessories
A veil is essential for classic bridal style, and birdcage veils with large netting that falls at cheekbone length epitomize the look. These simple veils frame the bride’s glowing face and highlight special jewelry. Ladylike wrist-length gloves are the perfect complement to vintage bridal looks.
The classic bridal look is a perfect match with a simple and elegant pair of pearl stud earrings and a lustrous 16-inch strand of cultured pearls around the bride’s neck. Pearls have long been associated with the essence of sophisticated womanhood in American pop culture.
“The Hindu Lord Krishna is said to have offered pearls to his daughter as a wedding gift, which is where pearls and weddings were first married,” says Jeremy Shepherd of PearlParadise.com, the world’s largest online pearl company. “Pearls are considered a symbol of purity, making them the perfect fit with a bride’s white dress.” Shepherd recommends white akoya pearls, a saltwater pearl that grows primarily in the coastal areas of Japan and China.
Considered to be the classic pearls for jewelry, akoya pearls are prized for their perfect round shape, mirror-like luster and soft, neutral colors.
The Look
Tie a classic dress and accessories together with a polished hairstyle such as a bun or chignon and keep makeup understated. Dark brown or black eyeliner extended slightly past the end of the eyelid, a touch of black mascara and a shade of red lipstick perfectly matched to the bride’s complexion are all that’s necessary to complete the perfect, classic Hollywood face.
— Courtesy of ARAcontent

Experienced Wedding Planner Can Save You Valuable Time & Money

An Experienced Wedding Planner Can Save You Valuable Time & Money, All the While Making Your Dreams Come True

As couples begin thinking about their wedding, they are often overwhelmed deciding how much to spend, where to obtain specialized services, and how to choose vendors. These worries can mount as quickly as the cost of the wedding does. And after the euphoria wears off and the reality settles in, it’s shocking to discover of how much preparation is involved in planning a wedding.

Faced with decisions about everything from invitation wording to planning their honeymoon, combined with full-time careers and limited time to devote to planning details, couples often find they want the help of a professional wedding planner.

Not long ago, a wedding coordinator was thought of as a luxury, only considered practical for couples with unlimited budgets. Now wedding planners are nearly essential to a well planned affair, having become indispensable today to many brides and grooms who find their services well worth the investment.

A wedding consultant guides you through the planning process and the wedding day itself, assisting in whatever capacity you need. He or she can help you refine your ideas, connect you to the appropriate vendors, advise you on proper etiquette, and suggest ways to use your budget wisely.

Read more about Wedding Consultants and Planners HERE

For a list of wedding planners & consultants in the Greater Cleveland and Akron/Canton areas, visit our website

2010 Wedding Jewelry Trends

Now that the new year is in full swing, designers everywhere are showing off their new collections. The fashion industry is simply buzzing with each designers’ prediction of what’s going to be hot this season. Wedding trends are no different – this multi million dollar a year industry is just as excited about new, trendy fashions. With the recession still holding a lot of people (and their wallets) down, accessories are huge.

Necklace by Kenneth Jay Lane

Traditionally, wedding jewelry is kept simple and feminine so that it accentuates the bride and her gown. This year however, big, bold jewelry is taking over the wedding scene. Layers are hugely popular and many brides will bring this into their wedding day attire. Large “bib” necklaces are expected to be a huge hit with brides this year. Vintage designed necklaces embellished with sparkling gemstones and soft, feminine pearls are the perfect statement piece to add to any gown.

If a large statement necklace is a bit too bold for you, there are a lot of other options! You can easily bring layers into your bracelets. Pile on the bangles for an exciting addition to your wedding day accessories. A great way to achieve a flawless look is to mix and match different styles. Instead of wearing ten strands of white pearls, layer just 2 or 3 pearl bracelets with a couple sparkly bangles. For that extra touch of flair, throw in some unexpected pieces like 1 or 2 strands of black Tahitian pearls. It will be a standout statement but still feminine and sophisticated.

Tejani Earrings

Big chandelier earrings are also big this season and there is no reason to leave this trend behind on your wedding day. Vintage is all the rage this year so find long, dangling earrings with a vintage twist. Soft metallics like gold or bronze are good choices and white, ivory or rose pearls always scream vintage. When your hair is in all of its up-do glory, chandelier earrings will frame your face perfectly. What’s even better is that most likely, the earrings you find to wear on your big day will integrate flawlessly into your every day wardrobe, so go ahead and splurge a little!

Last but not least, don’t forget your hair accessories. Short veils woven with soft pearls or worn with pill box hats are going to be hot this year. Accessories this season are all about femininity and sophistication. To spice up your hair, wind a long strand of pearls around a bun for an unexpected touch. Or, find a beautiful comb or clip made of bronze or copper that is embellished with sparkly gemstones and pearls. No matter what accessories you choose to wear on your big day you are sure to be the star of the show!

Piper Smith is the VP of Marketing for Museum Way Pearls, a leading provider of pearl jewelry such as pearl necklaces, pearl bracelets, pearl earrings, and much more.

Museum Way Pearls can be found online at: MuseumWayPearls.com.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Piper_Smith