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Here Comes The Vintage Bride

The trend for vintage shopping and heritage style is spilling into the bridal market. In a recent interview about bridal trends, Rachel Leonard, Brides Magazine fashion director, said “There is a market for vintage wedding dresses. Mixing old with new is big: It could be a dress or veil, or just vintage shoes or cocktail hat.” Two styles she says are very salable: 1950s designs with tight waist and full skirt, and 1930s Hollywood-inspired charmeuse gowns. The hit TV series “Mad Men” has created a yen for 1960s formal gowns. Not in demand: the 1970s peasant-look or bohemian garb.

Many women are shopping for high quality on a budget and are finding it in vintage clothing. “Under the current economic conditions, stretching the value for each dollar has become an important asset to this business,” says Laurie Pastor, co-owner of Jazzbug Vintage Events (jazzbugvintageevents.com), a creative event stylist company specializing in vintage themes. Young, urbane and “non-conformist” brides are also shopping vintage. They seek wedding attire with a twist. But young brides aren’t the only ones having all the fun. Second-time and older brides who may be looking for a romantic look have turned to bridal fashion from the past as well. Vintage themed anniversary parties are also very popular. Earth conscious consumers are also seeking vintage wedding dresses. With the growing awareness of living green and recycling, many brides take comfort in knowing that a vintage gown has no negative impact on the environment.

For more information on this dress and other vintage styles, continue reading here.

Back: 1929 crepe back satin wedding dress, sold for $250, pastperfectvintage.com

Front:  1929 crepe back satin wedding dress, sold for $250, pastperfectvintage.com

Weight Loss Tips – Wedding Workouts for Brides

So many people viewed my recent post “Weight Loss Tips for Weddings” that I decided to write another focused specifically on the best workout routines to prepare for the big day. I am not planning a wedding, I’m not even engaged, but I often wonder what I’d do if I had a few months to prepare for my wedding. I’m in two weddings this summer so I might employ some of these tips and tricks myself!

You don’t necessarily have to hit the gym to get toned for your wedding dress. There are lots of options for outdoor workouts, workouts for your living room, and routines with or without weights!

Here’s some of the best advice on the web when it comes to Workouts for your Wedding!

Sparkpeople.com – This site has a great, comprehensive list of workout ideas. The best part is, they break it down by dress type – what workout routine to do if you have a strapless dress, a backless dress, etc. I really liked this 20-minute, equipment-free wedding dress workout to tone your arms.

FitnessMagazine.com – What I love about this Bridal Boot Camp workout is that you only need a set of 15-pound dumbbells. It’s a total body routine and they offer a training video so you make sure you’re doing the moves correctly.

WomensHealthMag.com – They offer a great suggestion for a completely outdoor workout on your local running trail. It’s not geared to brides, specifically, but it will certainly do the drink when it comes to calorie-burn. They also suggest a Pilates workout for the pool that is simple, quick and will help keep your muscles long and lean.

Click on a few of these links and see which workout appeals to you! There’s so much out there – the most important thing is that you get moving and make a committment to doing a little something almost every day.

Good luck!

5 Hot Trends In Wedding Shoes For 2010

When making wedding preparations, brides usually give minimal attention to their wedding shoes. According to some people, shoes aren’t visible because they’re normally hidden inside the wedding dresses, whereas others say there is so much money spent on the wedding dresses that it becomes very difficult to spend on the shoes. This shouldn’t be the case. Your wedding shoes complement your wedding dress and therefore, should be given similar attention.

The trends for wedding shoes change along with trends for wedding dresses. Some of the wedding shoes that are trendy in 2010 are listed below:


1. Antique-looking wedding dresses are hot this year, resulting in styles of wedding shoes that show elements of the past such as Victorian-style beading.

2. Sexy and more feminine wedding shoes are trendy for 2010. “Strappy” styles will surely make the bride look sensual and daring as she walks down the aisle.

3. Embellished shoes, especially those using crystal or pave adornments, are also trendy for 2010.

4. Another top trend for 2010 is shoes with various shapes such as bows. If the shape is echoed in the dress, it can give a perfectly coordinated look.

5. Feathers in shoes are a new hot trend for 2010.

Wedding shoes are an important part of your wedding plans as they complement the dress. Trendy wedding shoes give a contemporary look to the bride and coordinate with current dress styles.   So, when purchasing your wedding shoes, consider what is trendy this year.

About the Author:
Paolo is the owner of onlinebridalstore.com that provides wedding accessories.  In the last ten years he delicately working on online bridal accessories like bridal shoes, wedding jewelry, wedding shoes, etc.

Under Creative Commons License: Attribution No Derivatives

A Wedding Dress Box vs a Plastic Bag For Your Valuable Dress

By: UK Wedding Store

When trying to decide what kind of storage to use for your wedding dress, you may be stuck between a proper wedding dress box, or a plastic bag. Let’s take a look at reasons why you should use a proper box instead of a bag.

A Proper Wedding Dress Box

A proper wedding dress box will be acid free (because the acid will break down the fabric and cause discoloration) and will also be pH neutral, because a box that is acid free without being neutral will likely have a reverse alkalinity which will cause the same kind of damage as not having an acid free box. The proper wedding dress box will also be solid with no viewing window, because a viewing window will let light in.

A Plastic Bag

While it may be good to help you get your dress from the store to the seamstress for alterations and to the cleaners after the wedding, using a plastic bag allows light to get to the dress which will break down the fabric and lead to discoloration. In addition to light, the bag will likely be more susceptible to moisture which can cause the dress to mildew and mold. As time goes on, the plastic bag will break down, whereas the proper dress box will stay intact. Chances are the plastic composition of the bag will also contain acids that will break down the fabric.

While it may be more cost-effective to store your dress in a bag initially, in the end it will do more harm than good when you go to take out the dress in a few years to give to your daughter, friend, or other loved one to find it ruined with discoloration and weakened fabric.

Save yourself potential heartbreak later and store your dress correctly with an acid free, pH neutral wedding dress box. This way you know your dress will be safe through it all and when it is time to renew those vows, you will be ready to go.

Contact any of the vendors listed on our Website for more information on Gown Preservation

About the Author

UK Wedding Store is an online retailer of wedding favors, favor boxes and wedding dress boxes.

(ArticlesBase SC #1517996)

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/A Wedding Dress Box vs a Plastic Bag For Your Valuable Dress

Get the Facts – Wedding Dress Preservation

By: Katherine Wright

Why Preserve Your Bridal Gown?

You spent a great deal of time and thought selecting your wedding dress. You may hope that a younger sister or perhaps even a daughter will someday wear your gown. Or you may want to hold onto your beautiful gown for sentimental reasons. Either way, your wedding gown is a treasured keepsake that if properly cleaned and preserved, can last for years to come.

After the wedding, many bridal gowns are left in the plastic garment bag with good intentions of cleaning and preservation sometime soon. That soon often turns into weeks, and then years. This procrastination poses some serious risks to the gown:

  • Oxidation of stains, seen and unseen. Your dress may have noticeable stains from food or make-up, or the hemline may be soiled. Or your dress may look clean to you, but don’t be fooled, spills from alcoholic beverages or clear soda may dry clear, but oxidize with time, turn brown and become more difficult to remove later. Body perspiration may cause the dress lining to turn brittle over time. Your dress needs to be cleaned in order to keep it in the best condition possible.
  • Plastic fumes: Gowns kept in plastic gown bags are exposed to the most harmful environment possible: plastic fumes. Most plastic gives off chemical fumes that cause the yellowing of bridal gowns. Some brides take the initiative to get their dress cleaned, but still leave their gown in the dry-cleaner’s plastic wrap or garment bag.

Cleaning and preserving your bridal gown as soon as possible ensures that your gown remains in the best condition possible. Ideally, your dress should be cleaned and preserved within days or weeks of your wedding.

Determining the Best Gown Preservation

A good way to determine the best bridal gown preservation technique would be to check with museum textile conservators to see how they preserve heirloom garments.

Museum Garment Preservation

The Victoria and Albert Museum in London has a wonderful collection of gowns that are hundreds of years old. The dresses in storage are hung on padded hangers and covered with cotton sheeting to protect them.

Garment preservation at the Smithsonian Institute in Washington D.C. is similar. Heirloom garments that are not currently on display are cleaned and carefully stored in climate controlled conditions. Many dresses are hung on padded hangers, while some garments are laid in drawers or acid free boxes with acid free tissue. Sharp creases are avoided, as they can damage fabric. To keep the folds from becoming permanent creases, the garments stored in boxes or drawers are refolded into a different position every few years.

Neither of these museums seals any of their heirloom garments. Museum conservators discourage sealing any garment in any container for three reasons:

  1. Fabric weakens where it is folded. Fabric weakens in the same way that paper weakens where it is folded, so that creases from the folds may become permanent. (You may have experienced this if you have ever let down the hem on a garment.) Or worse, the fabric may tear at the weakened creases. This is why the Smithsonian refolds the garments stored in drawers and boxes periodically.
  2. Inspection is critical. Periodic inspection ensures that the garment does not develop permanent damage from oxidizing stains or any other problems. The sooner problems are discovered, the more likely they can be remedied.
  3. Sealing promotes mold and mildew. If the textile can breathe, then the humidity remains constant around the garment. If any moisture were to condense inside a storage container, it would likely develop mildew.

Museum conservators recommend keeping heirloom garments: clean, cool, dry and wrinkle-free.

Bridal Gown Preservation

The first step to wedding gown preservation is to have it cleaned thoroughly.  Keeping your gown in the best possible condition is your next goal. You will need to protect it from:

  • Yellowing
  • Permanent creasing
  • Mildew and mold
  • Oxidation spots
  • Light
  • Dust

Yellowing
It’s important to note that one of the leading causes of bridal gown yellowing is the plastic bags that many brides keep their gowns in. Most plastics give off damaging fumes that actually promote yellowing. But, even with proper care, some fabrics will yellow more than others and it may be impossible to prevent all yellowing.

Generally, silk fabric yellows more than synthetic fabrics, such as polyester, rayon and acetate. However, nylon, which is a synthetic, has a tendency to yellow more than other synthetic fabrics. Gowns that can be wet cleaned have an advantage, in that if they do yellow, they may be able to be whitened for future use with a fabric whitener.

Preserving your gown in an acid-free environment is your best protection against yellowing. Padding your gown with acid-free tissue will help to prevent acid migration. Buffered tissue should be used for gowns made of synthetic fabrics such as polyester, rayon, and acetate. The buffering agents in the buffered tissue gives added protection against acid migration. But buffering agents may damage gowns made of animal proteins such as silk or wool, therefore un-buffered, acid-free tissue is recommended for silk fabrics.

What about warranties against yellowing?
Some preservation companies advertise that their preservation method will prevent yellowing and they may even offer a warranty. Look carefully at any warranty offered by these companies. One warranty offered by a leading on-line preservation company stated that they will cover discoloration and damages caused by their company’s cleaning and preservation processes. Another simply states that the gown may be returned to a participating dealer for inspection and pressing. None of them state that they will replace an aged, yellowed gown with a new gown.

Keeping your gown in the best overall condition should be the primary concern in preserving your bridal gown. So, protect your gown! Get it out of the plastic bag and have it cleaned and preserved in an acid-free environment.

Permanent creasing
Flat storage is recommended for textiles and garments when possible. However, because of the size and dimensions of wedding gowns, it is impractical. Some compromise must be made, either by folding or hanging the gown. To help prevent permanent creasing, boxed gowns should be refolded into a different position every 2 – 3 years. (Cotton gloves should always be worn when handling preserved gowns.) Bagged gowns that are hung in a closet are not at risk for permanent creasing, and will not need to be handled periodically.

Mildew and mold
Keeping your gown in a breathable environment will protect it best from mildew and mold growth. When fabrics can breathe, the humidity level remains constant around the garment as excess moisture dissipates into the air. But, if moisture can condense inside a box or any container, then the gown is at risk for mildew and mold growth.

Oxidation spots
An oxidation spot can occur when a substance that was not properly cleaned on the dress oxidizes and turns brown. This can happen even if your dress has been cleaned as dry-cleaning solvents do not remove all substances. Spills from clear soda or wine may go unnoticed at the time of the initial cleaning. Unless these spills are pretreated, it is likely they will oxidize over time. Inspecting preserved gowns periodically ensures the gown remains in the best condition. The sooner an oxidized stain is caught, the more likely it will be able to be removed.

Light and dust
Keeping your gown covered will protect it from the damage caused by light and dust.

Preservation Options

There are several different types of gown preservation offered today. While there are slight variations offered, each will usually fall into one of these three categories:

  • Sealing
  • Boxing
  • Bagging

Sealing, Boxing or Bagging your Bridal Gown

Sealing
Most bridal gown preservation companies preserve bridal gowns in an acid-free box. Many have a window in which to see the gown. Acid-free tissue is usually used to buffer the folds and a cardboard shape is often used to fill the bodice area of the gown. However, some companies actually seal the gown inside the box.

The assumption with sealing the bridal gown is that the dress needs to be protected from oxygen. However, sealing a bridal gown puts it at greater risk for mildew and permanent creasing damage. Inspection is also impossible if the gown is sealed.

Boxing
Boxed preservation is similar to the sealing method but has some important differences. Like the sealing method, your dress is first cleaned and pressed, and then folded into an acid-free box. Sharp creases are avoided, and acid free tissue is used to buffer the folds. However, unlike the sealing method, the box is not sealed, and you are encouraged to open and inspect your gown.

Because the box is not sealed, the fabric can still breathe. And you will be able to refold your gown periodically. This will help protect your gown from getting permanent creases.

The appeal for a boxed or sealed gown is often greatest for brides with large dresses hoping to get their gowns out of their closet. However, this method may work best for smaller gowns that require minimal folding.

Acid-free box or just acid-free coated?
The quality of the acid-free boxes can vary significantly. Many preservation boxes are simply regular cardboard boxes with an acid free coating. These coatings will not hold up as well as authentic archival boxes made from actual acid-free board.

Bagging your bridal gown
This newer preservation method is not really so new. It is similar to what museums have used for preserving heirloom costumes and gowns for years. Often referred to as Museum Method,TM this preservation method is an excellent option, as it keeps the dress protected from dust and light. The gown remains un-folded, so permanent creasing risks are reduced. The bag allows the gown to breathe, which is essential in protecting the gown from mold and mildew. A bagged gown is the easiest to inspect periodically and requires no re-folding as the boxed method does.

Strapless and spaghetti strapped gowns, as well as heavy gowns should be reinforced with twill tape to add support, and eliminate any damage from long-term hanging. A padded hanger is also essential for long-term storage.

It is important to remember that a clean dress should not be left in the dry-cleaner’s plastic wrap or put back into a plastic garment bag. Remember, most plastics are an enemy to textiles. And the bagged gown should always be kept in climate controlled conditions. This is easily done is most closets.

Gown Preservation Options Overview

Sealing Benefits

Boxing Benefits

Bagging Benefits

  • Acid-free environment

  • Acid-free environment

  • Acid-free environment

  • Easily stored

  • Easily stored

  • Easily stored

  • Protected from dust and light

  • Protected from dust and light

  • Protected from dust and light

  • Can be inspected and admired

  • Most easily inspected and admired

  • Dress can breathe

  • Dress can breathe

  • Can be refolded periodically

  • Does not need refolding

  • No permanent creasing

  • Best air circulation

  • Needs no maintenance

No matter what type of preservation you choose, you should keep your preserved gown in a climate-controlled area. Do not be tempted to put your preserved gown in an attic or damp basement where temperatures and humidity levels will fluctuate dramatically. Fluctuating temperatures increase the deterioration rate of textiles.
 Leaving your wedding gown in a vinyl bridal gown bag will promote rapid yellowing. This article discusses this and other risks of not preserving wedding gowns. Also discussed are museum recommended garment preservation techniques, and the benefits of the varying wedding gown preservation options of sealing, boxing or Museum Method (hanging) preservation.
 

About the Author

Katherine Wright is a wedding gown preservation specialist and general partner of Heritage Garment Preservation located in Benicia, California providing Museum Method wedding gown preservation to the United States, Canada, and Europe.

(ArticlesBase SC #636831)

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/Get the Facts – Wedding Dress Preservation

Latest Trend in Wedding Veils: the Birdcage Veil

by Benjamin Dover,  Staff Writer Factoidz.com

Although the “birdcage” name refers to the shaping of the veil to “float” over the face, head (or part of the face and head) and to extend no longer than the chin, it’s a common misconception that “birdcage” means anything made with large-gauge millinery netting.  But “birdcage” is the style (slightly bouffant and “enclosing” the face like a cage), not the fabric.  A birdcage-style short bridal veil can be made from the usual fine tulle of traditional veils–but the stiffness of the larger-gauge netting is more conducive to “floating” over the face without rubbing against the ends of the eyelashes.

Generally made of French, Russian or English netting–all essentially the same except for the ever-so-slightly increasing size (3/8-, 1/4-, or 1/2-inch, respectively) of the squares in the net, these veils may be unadorned and anchored by a clear comb, or have that stark simplicity offset by a dramatic ornament.  Even with the modern minimalist twist of cropping the length of the netting to just below eye-level or sweeping asymmetrically across the face, the statement of that big-gauge milliners’ netting lends the look a retro-chic tone from the 30’s and 40’s that couldn’t be more up-to-the-minute right now.



Actually, if our social customs were more attuned to the cocktail-hat set across “the Pond,” we would already be familiar with this type of headpiece as a “Fascinator,” as the English call them –a cocktail topper that’s more of an oversized hair ornament (often including a bit of this netting) than an actual hat.

Because of the bold geometry of the netting, the birdcage veil is at its best with simply-cut gowns in richly-draping fabrics, without lace, beading, or embroidery to vie for visual attention.  Perhaps, since brooches made their comeback a year or two ago and there are some fabulous ones available, you might purchase a matching pair of rhinestone brooches, one as a focal point on the gown, and the other by itself or as the center of the embellishment to the headpiece (often feathers or a circle of the gathered netting–but the overall look can also be softened by some retro-looking florals, keeping the monotone of ivory or white).

Less is definitely more with a birdcage veil; although it’s relatively small in comparison with other veils, it makes a strong, fashion-forward statement.  It needs to be carried off with confidence, so it’s not for a timid, traditional bride.

If that confidence and a love of being a little different sounds like you, consider the look of a birdcage veil.


To find a bridal shop near you visit our website at http://www.todaysbrideonline.com/topics/bridalattire.phtml


Wedding Dress Style Guide

When shopping for your wedding dress, you should first consider which gown style you prefer. When selecting your wedding dress style, consider the silhouette, sleeves, neckline, bodice and train. Following is guide to the basic terminology of popular wedding gown styles.

The Silhouette

  • A-line – The A-line or princess dress has no marked waist and the vertical seams flow from the shoulders down to a flared skirt, creating a “A” shape.
  • Ball Gowns – These gowns normally quite formal, reminding you of Cinderella. The bodice is fitted with a very full skirt.
  • Empire – Empire gowns have a raised waistline that starts right under the bust, flowing to a slim (but not body-hugging) skirt.
  • Mermaid – As the name indicates, the mermaid dress is contoured against the body then the gown flows out beginning around the knees. This is the sexiest of the styles.
  • Sheath – The sheath or column dress has a slim shape that follows close to the line of the body. The straight design is form-fitting and doesn’t allow for many body flaws.
Lavender Bridal, Mia Solano
A-line
Belle Noche, Maggie Sottero
Ball Gowns
Henri's Cloud Nine, Pronovias
Empire
Doreen Leaf Designs, House of Wu
Mermaid
Belle Noche, Maggie Sottero
Sheath

The Sleeves

  • 3/4 sleeves – end between the elbow and wrist.
  • Bell – long sleeves, flare out toward the wrist creating a bell shape.
  • Cap – rounded sleeves, just covering shoulders.
  • Fitted point – long, fitted sleeves that come to a point over the hand.
  • Juliet – long, fitted sleeves with puffy shoulders.
  • Long sleeves – long sleeves that are normally form-fitting.
  • Off-the-shoulder Sleeves – cover the upper part of the arm but leave the tops of shoulders exposed.
  • Poet – long sleeves, fitted to the elbow then flared.
  • Pouf – short sleeves, gathered to create a poufy look.
  • Short sleeves – about the length of T-shirt sleeves.
  • Sleeveless – strapless with no sleeves.
  • Spaghetti straps – thin spaghetti straps with no sleeves.

The Neckline

  • Bateau – close to straight across from the tip of the shoulder. Gives plenty of coverage.
  • Halter – wraps around the back of the neck to create deep armholes. Often also a backless style, which is very sexy.
  • High – covers most of the neck. Creates a formal, somewhat stiff look.
  • Jewel – similar to that of a T-shirt. Creates a bustier look.
  • Off-The-Shoulder – as the name indicates, the top of the shoulders are bare. Showcases your collarbone and shoulders.
  • Portrait – a very wide scoop from the tip of one shoulder to the tip of the other.
  • Scoop – classic U-shaped neckline. Can be cut low for a more sexy look.
  • Square – squared neckline, often associated with empire gowns.
  • Strapless – normally straight across. Not recommended for women with small busts.
  • Sweetheart – shaped like the top half of a heart. Emphasizes the cleavage.
  • V-Neck – dips in the front into a V-shape. Can be very deep.
Dora's Bridal, Christina Wu
Halter
Peneventures
Off-The-Shoulder
Coming attractions, Allure
Strapless
Amanda's Bridal, Mia Solano
Sweetheart
David's Bridal
V-Neck

The Bodice
The bodice refers to the portion of the dress between the neckline and skirt.

  • Corset – a form fitting bodice with boning and lace-up closures.
  • Halter – sleeveless bodice that wraps around you neck, normally backless.
  • Midriff – fits very closely around the mid-section, accentuating your waist.
  • Surplice – sections of fabric cross wrap in the front or back.
  • Tank – sleeveless with wide armholes like tank top.
Doreen Leaf Designs, House of Wu
Corset
David's Bridal
Halter
Henri's Cloud Nine, Pronovias
Midriff
Dora's Bridal, Christina Wu
Surplice
David's Bridal
Tank

The Train

  • Sweep – 8″ to 12″ in length, just a few inches longer than the gown.
  • Court – extends about 3 feet from the waist.
  • Chapel – extends about 4 feet from the waist.
  • Cathedral – extends about 6 to 9 feet from the waist.
  • Royal – extends more than 9 feet from the waist.

The Veil

  • Birdcage – falls right below the chin, usually attached to a headpiece.
  • Flyaway – ends at the shoulder.
  • Blusher – worn over your face, about 28″ long.
  • Elbow Length – ends at the elbow or waist.
  • Fingertip – ends at the finger tips or just below the waist.
  • Ballet – ends at the ankles.
  • Chapel – ends slightly longer than dress length.
  • Cathedral – 9 feet or longer.

Article By Yours Truly http://www.articlesbase.com

Start looking for your wedding gown by searching on Today’s Bride Bridal Attire page. You will find great local bridal boutiques that can help you find your perfect wedding dress.